Amadou Sanogo, Sans tête (Les fachés), 2016, Acrylic on canvas, 173 x 154 cm. Courtesy MAGNIN-A
Amadou Sanogo, Sans tête (Les fachés), 2016, Acrylic on canvas, 173 x 154 cm. Courtesy MAGNIN-A  

Amadou Sanogo received his first pictorial impressions around the large market of his hometown. His Segovian art teacher encouraged him to undertake his studies at the Institut National des Arts in Bamako, one of the most reputed schools of fine arts in West Africa. Renowned for its famed student Abdoulaye Konaté, Sanogo refined his own studies there in the early 2000s. Refusing academicism, however, Sanogo is rather an autodidact. Indeed, his first paintings were on sheets and canvas in different sizes found at the fabric market. Having invented his own pictorial codes, his works are invested with an unfeigned passion, exploring his own life experiences alongside the history of his country, its epics and recent events. Sanogo leads his own artistic guerrilla war – notably, with humour – in order to confront issues of political stagnation, stupidity and greed.